More in this section

In the news

Uganda: Scientists roll out better, nutrient-rich animal forage

October 21st, 2015 / Daily Monitor, Uganda

Small scale livestock farming in Africa can become more intensive yet sustainable if better and more nutritious forage is used to feed the animals. This could benefit farming activities especially in rural Sub-Saharan Africa and see a shift from the increased reliance on ordinary pasture grazing.
Read …

Q&A: Put farmers at heart of ‘adoption revolution’

October 20th, 2015 / SciDev.net

SciDev.net talks to Pamela Anderson, director of agricultural development for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Her team works to reduce poverty, improve nutrition and strengthen women’s roles in smallholder farming families in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. The Foundation aims to put smallholders at centre of decision-making, and invests …

Kenya: What scientists are doing to eliminate deadly wheat rust

October 20th, 2015 / Daily Nation

Wheat rust cuts production by up to 70%, heaping losses on farmers. To learn more, read this interview with Ruth Wanyera, a plant pathologist and principal research scientist at Food Crop Research Institute, Njoro, and a winner of the 2015 Borlaug Global Rust Initiative (BGRI) Gene Stewardship Award. (Photo: Ron …

Uganda: Gov’t to unveil system letting farmers know if inputs are counterfeit

October 20th, 2015 / The Independent, by B4FA Fellow Isaac Khisa

The Ugandan government plans to unveil a system that will enable farmers determine whether inputs are genuine or counterfeits at point of sale. Starting next year, farmers will find a code on agriculture input products that can be texted to a toll-free number. In return, the farmer will receive a …

Banana extinction is on the horizon once more

October 19th, 2015 / Food World News

Until 1965, the Gros Michel banana cultivar was the world’s most popular, but it became commercially extinct because of the virulent Panama disease. Today’s most popular commercial banana, the Cavendish, was quickly adopted worldwide due to its immunity to Panama disease, but its lack of genetic diversity makes it vulnerable …

Ethiopia: Adopting biotechnology for agricultural improvement

October 19th, 2015 / Ethiopian Herald/AllAfrica

The Ethiopian government has accepted the adaptation of biotech to help boost agricultural productivity. This editorial calls for full support of Ethiopian agricultural researchers while urging care around biosafety, stating “The proper utilization of biotechnology has a power to revolutionize the nation’s agricultural endeavour.”
Read …

More women researchers needed ‘to deliver food security’

October 19th, 2015 / BBC

At the 2015 Borlaug Dialogue conference in the US, Chelsea Clinton told delegates that women were a “crucial, vital and necessary” part of delivering global food security. Another speaker, Wanjiru Kamau-Rutenberg – director of the Kenya-based African Women in Agricultural Research and Development (Award) – said, “We need to increase …

Food and the transformation of Africa

October 16th, 2015 / Foreign Affairs, by Kofi Annan and Sam Dryden

Agriculture is about more than yields. A vast food system spreads beyond farm and table to touch almost every aspect of life in every society. Making that system in Africa as robust as possible will not merely prevent starvation. It will also fight poverty, disease, and malnutrition; create businesses and …

World Food Day 2015: Female farmers hold the key to food security and ending poverty

October 16th, 2015 / International Business Times

Women are the cornerstone of the rural economy, especially in the developing world. They bear the greatest responsibility for food production, producing more than half of all food in the world and growing 80-90% of the food in sub-Saharan Africa. Yet despite this, women are all too often left out …

Malawi’s toxic harvest: the problem with aflatoxins

October 16th, 2015 / SciDevNet

Floods followed by drought have led to a 30 per cent reduction in Malawi’s maize harvest and left the country facing its most severe food crisis for over ten years. On top of this, much of the harvest will be contaminated with aflatoxins, fungi-produced toxins that contaminate groundnut, maize, sorghum and …