In the news...

Uganda: Scientists roll out better, nutrient-rich animal forage

October 21st, 2015 / Daily Monitor, Uganda

Small scale livestock farming in Africa can become more intensive yet sustainable if better and more nutritious forage is used to feed the animals. This could benefit farming activities especially in rural Sub-Saharan Africa and see a shift from the increased reliance on ordinary pasture grazing.
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Q&A: Put farmers at heart of ‘adoption revolution’

October 20th, 2015 / SciDev.net

SciDev.net talks to Pamela Anderson, director of agricultural development for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Her team works to reduce poverty, improve nutrition and strengthen women’s roles in smallholder farming families in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. The Foundation aims to put smallholders at centre of decision-making, and invests …

Ethiopia: Adopting biotechnology for agricultural improvement

October 19th, 2015 / Ethiopian Herald/AllAfrica

The Ethiopian government has accepted the adaptation of biotech to help boost agricultural productivity. This editorial calls for full support of Ethiopian agricultural researchers while urging care around biosafety, stating “The proper utilization of biotechnology has a power to revolutionize the nation’s agricultural endeavour.”
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More women researchers needed ‘to deliver food security’

October 19th, 2015 / BBC

At the 2015 Borlaug Dialogue conference in the US, Chelsea Clinton told delegates that women were a “crucial, vital and necessary” part of delivering global food security. Another speaker, Wanjiru Kamau-Rutenberg – director of the Kenya-based African Women in Agricultural Research and Development (Award) – said, “We need to increase …

Food and the transformation of Africa

October 16th, 2015 / Foreign Affairs, by Kofi Annan and Sam Dryden

Agriculture is about more than yields. A vast food system spreads beyond farm and table to touch almost every aspect of life in every society. Making that system in Africa as robust as possible will not merely prevent starvation. It will also fight poverty, disease, and malnutrition; create businesses and …

World Food Day 2015: Female farmers hold the key to food security and ending poverty

October 16th, 2015 / International Business Times

Women are the cornerstone of the rural economy, especially in the developing world. They bear the greatest responsibility for food production, producing more than half of all food in the world and growing 80-90% of the food in sub-Saharan Africa. Yet despite this, women are all too often left out …

Africa’s youth and abundant arable land are a potential winning combination

October 15th, 2015 / The Conversation

Africa’s agricultural sector has the lowest productivity in the world, contributing to food insecurity and malnutrition on the continent. But sub-Saharan Africa has two abundant resources: its youth and agricultural land. With the youngest population globally and the largest share of the world’s arable land, Africa stands to benefit greatly …

Nigerian tech whiz Nasir Yammama on farming app Verdant and being an active farmer

October 13th, 2015 / AllAfrica

Nigerian tech wiz Nasir Yammama’s agronomy mobile phone service Verdant is helping 500,000 farmers from pre-planting period – with information about weather conditions, improved seedlings, inputs and best practices – all the way to selling farm produce. The Daily Trust interviews him about Verdant, his foray into active farming, and …

Delivering sustainable development goals in Africa

October 13th, 2015 / International Policy Digest

In September 2015, world leaders unanimously adopted the sustainable development goals (SDGs) during the 70th UN General Assembly, signalling a united, mutually collective front against hunger, malnutrition, poverty, unemployment, disease, climate change, low agricultural productivity, degraded ecosystems and social inequity, among the notable challenges particularly facing Africa. What are some …

How EU countries opting out of GMOs affect the rest of the world

October 12th, 2015 / Science 2.0

For the EU countries that are opting out of GM, not much changes in terms of current farming practice, and the decision has no real cost to their citizens. It does; however, deny many EU farmers potentially valuable options in the future, particularly as the science of genetic engineering advances. …