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Researchers find genetic mechanism that could enhance cereal yields

January 11th, 2018 / ISAAA, US

A research team from the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center led by Andrea Eveland has identified a genetic mechanism that could increase the yields of cereal crops. The team performed the research in Setaria viridis, a grass that is closely related to economically important cereal crops and bioenergy feed stocks …

Scientists project good harvest this year, as plans to release BT cotton, Cowpea, others gain support

January 10th, 2018 / Nigerian Tribune

Scientists in Nigeria have said that plans to release BT cotton, Pod Borer Resistant (PBR) Cowpea, Genetically Modified Cassava and other crops have been given green light, as Confined Field Trial for these crops have been conducted successfully.
The scientists also said that the formal release of these crops to farmers …

What innovations in food production are likely to have significant Impact in the next decade?

January 10th, 2018 / The Borlaug Blog, World Food Prize

Dr. Robert Mwanga, 2016 World Food Prize Laureate, writes:
“Innovations in food production” is a broad topic. These innovations are diverse and hold immense potential in addressing hunger in the world, but the main critical factors to significantly impact planet earth in the next decade must be considered first. We must …

GM potato: Variety could deflate GMO myths’ bubble in Uganda

January 10th, 2018 / Daily Monitor, Uganda

Uganda is steadily progressing towards having a potato that will not require chemical spraying. This is because scientists at National Agricultural Research Organisation (Naro) and International Potato Centre have developed Late Blight resistant variety, Vic 1 from the popularly grown susceptible Victoria variety.
According to Dr Alex Barekye, who is the …

Introducing groundnut varieties more tolerant to Rosette disease in Tanzania

January 9th, 2018 / ICRISAT

Groundnut researchers are striving to introduce superior options to a popular early-maturing groundnut variety, Pendo (ICGMS 33), in Tanzania. Although Pendo has many strengths compared to other varieties, it is highly susceptible to rosette disease. Efforts are on, under the Tropical Legumes III project, to develop and disseminate varieties that …

Herbicide-resistant ‘super weeds’? Don’t blame GMO crops

January 9th, 2018 / Genetic Literacy Project, US

Genetically engineered (GE) herbicide-resistant crops have been widely adopted by farmers in the United States and other countries around the world, and these crops have caused significant changes in herbicide use patterns.
GE crops have been blamed for increased problems with herbicide-resistant weeds (colloquially called by the misnomer “superweeds”); however, there …

… on B4FA.org

January 9th, 2018

New on B4FA.org:

No discussion about the history of science, technology and innovation policy in Africa is complete without mentioning Calestous Juma. He championed the use of technological innovation to tackle sustainable development challenges like food insecurity, climate change, poverty and disease – especially in African countries. This is how we should …

Ethiopian scientist impacting lives of small-scale farmers

January 8th, 2018 / AfricanNews.com

Dr. Segenet Kelemu according to Gates, having witnessed the damage locusts wreak in rural Ethiopia, aspired to study agriculture and today “used the power of science to find ways to help farmers grow more food and earn more income.”
In the latest installment of his ‘Heroes in the Field’ series, philanthropist …

Gene editing: The key to food security in a warmer world?

January 8th, 2018 / Deutsche Welle, Germany

At the Justus Liebig University in Gießen, Germany, scientist Karl-Heinz Kogler is fighting diseases that affect wheat and other crops. His new weapon is the gene-editing technique CRISPR-cas9. It allows him to literally edit organisms, removing bits of DNA responsible for undesirable outcomes.
Recently, he and his team edited the wheat …

A peace plan for resolving GMO conflict

January 8th, 2018 / Alliance for Science, US

Five years ago, environmentalist Mark Lynas stood before the UK Oxford Farming Conference and offered a public apology for his earlier anti-GMO activism. In the years since, he’s devoted himself pretty much full time to the GM issue, visiting numerous countries in Africa and Asia and meeting farmers, scientists, activists …