In the news...

Tanzania relaxes law on GMOs

June 8th, 2015 / The EastAfrican, Kenya

B4FA Fellow Isaac Khisa reports: Tanzania has reviewed its law on genetically modified organisms, paving the way for scientists in the country to carry out confined trials on crops such as maize and cassava, and effectively turning the tables on anti-GMO lobby groups. This move to revise its GMO law …

Genetic engineering is just a tool

May 25th, 2015 / Genetic Literacy Project, US

“Genetic engineering is just a tool and in itself is neither good or bad, says Iida Ruishalme” Read …

Disease and flood tolerant rice

May 23rd, 2015 / National Geographic, US

Plant pathologist and geneticist at the University of California, Davis, Pamela Ronald’s lab has isolated genes from rice that can resist diseases and tolerate floods. When those genes are inserted into existing rice plants, they help farmers grow high-yield harvests in places where the crop is a vulnerable staple. …

The GMO that could feed 1 billion people: C4 rice explained

May 22nd, 2015 / International Rice Research Institute (IRRI)

VIDEO: C4 rice (http://c4rice.irri.org) is a genetically modified crop projected to save one billion people by 2025. It’ll give us up to 50% more rice “for free” – much more rice will be grown, for the people who most need it, without any extra resources being used up. Read …

Aflatoxin contamination costs Tanzanian agriculture greatly

May 22nd, 2015 / Xinhua News Agency

Tanzania is losing over 332 million U.S. dollars annually from the negative impacts of aflatoxin, a deadly toxin affecting cereal crops like maize, sorghum, rice, wheat, groundnuts and cassava, researchers said on Wednesday. “Agricultural products contaminated with aflatoxin poses a major threat to human and animal health,” said Bendantunguka Tiisekwa, …

Solution to virus-threatened African cassava faces anti-GMO protests

May 14th, 2015 / Genetic Literacy Project, US

Cassava, Uganda’s major staple after matooke, feeds over half a billion people in the world with Africa contributing to about 50% of the global production. But the crop is threatened, and it appears that only the only solution rests with advanced biotechnology to create virus resistant transgenic varieties. Read …

Uganda ruling party greenlights superbananas and other GMOs

May 11th, 2015 / AllAfrica.com

Uganda’s ruling party has approved a bill that will give the green light to superbananas and other genetically modified foods. The ruling National Resistance Movement (NRM) parliamentary caucus has agreed on the controversial National Biotechnology and Biosafety Bill, signaling that Uganda will soon adopt a “GMO bill”. Read …

Can Seed Technology Bring Africa Food Security By 2030?

May 5th, 2015 / AFK Insider

Africa’s seed industry is complex and can be inefficient, with most farmers using the same seeds they have been planting for generations, unlike farmers in the West who use seeds that have been improved to resist drought or disease. Read …

The future of food: growing more with the same land

May 4th, 2015 / The Conversation, UK

There are three main reasons why the productivity of existing farmland will need to dramatically increase in the next 40 years.
The world’s population is unlikely to stabilise this century and is on course to reach up to 12 billion by 2100. That’s double the existing population and a lot of …

GMOs could save banana industry but could consumers accept it?

May 4th, 2015 / Genetic Literacy Project

The international banana industry only has itself to blame for its vulnerability to panama disease, and faces annihilation if the fungus continues to spread, according to an expert on global banana production.The banana industry is a monoculture, focussing primarily on the growth and trade of the Cavendish banana. Read …