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An overview of agriculture, nutrition and fortification, supplementation and biofortification

September 24th, 2018 / Agriculture & Food Security

Alan Dubock writes:
The worlds growing population and limited land resources require high intensity of food production. Human nutrition needs both macronutrients and micronutrients. One way of providing micronutrients in staple crops of the poor is biofortification, through plant breeding. All methods of plant breeding are acceptable and safe, and …

Africa: Continent of challenge and opportunity

September 21st, 2018 / The Star, Kenya

LIAM CONDON, Member of the Board of Management and President of the Crop Science Division at Bayer AG writes:
I have a passion for learning about different cultures and languages. This probably comes from the fact that I grew up in Ireland, an island separated from continental Europe, so I always …

Quartz Africa Innovators 2018: A list of 30 pioneers

September 21st, 2018 / Quartz Africa

This is the fourth edition of the Quartz Africa Innovators, our annual series identifying some of the most ambitious and imaginative minds on the continent. The 30 movers and thinkers on this list range across fields from the arts and science to technology and entrepreneurship and beyond.
They all have one …

Intensive farming ‘least bad option’ for food and environment

September 20th, 2018 / BBC

Intensive, high-yielding agriculture may be the best way to meet growing demand for food while conserving biodiversity, say researchers.
But their study says the approach makes sense only if it is linked to more wilderness being spared the plough.
Intensive farming is said to create high levels of pollution and damage the …

As the battle against climate change intensifies, farmers find relief in agricultural innovations

September 20th, 2018 / Medium.com

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) just released its 2018 State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World (SOFI) report. Two alarming facts immediately stand out.
First, for the third straight year — and after a long period of decline — the number of undernourished people in the world has …

Viewpoint: No, wild bees haven’t been decimated by neonicotinoids, glyphosate

September 20th, 2018 / Genetic Literacy Project, US

Bees and pesticides (and not just insecticides) have been the focus of activists and scientists alike, particularly since a 2006-2008 wave of Colony Collapse Disorder, during which millions of domestic honeybees disappeared.
For a few years, environmental groups like the Sierra Club and Natural Resources Defense Council claimed that insecticides, particularly …

How a technology scaled up to reach millions

September 17th, 2018 / Perdue University

Why do we turn on our radios? For music, entertainment and maybe for news, if we’re feeling virtuous. Hardly anyone in the United States would say they turn on their radios for the advertisements. But if you’re a farmer in Eastern or Western Africa, a radio advertisement could be the …

Blue-green algae promises to boost yields of important food crops

September 12th, 2018 / ISAAA

Scientists at the Australian National University (ANU) have engineered tiny carbon-capturing engines from blue-green algae into plants. This breakthrough promises to help boost the yields of important food crops such as wheat, cowpeas, and cassava. Read …

Embracing biotech crops and why Nigeria’s GMO fight is far from over

September 11th, 2018 / Genetic Literacy Project

When examining Nigeria’s potential to step into an agricultural leadership role in the region, it’s important to consider what it took to get this far — as well as the forces that long opposed GMOs throughout that nation, writes bioinformaticist Abraham Isah. Read …

GMOs are not agriculture’s future – biotech Is

September 7th, 2018 / Scientific American

… agriculture needs to adapt. The only question is how can we move forward in a way that does not repeat the mistakes of the GMO (genetically modified organism) era? The answer lies in newer technologies that allow us to responsibly develop crops that never integrate non-native elements into a …