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Ethiopia: A new manual shares best environmentally friendly commercial coffee-production

August 18th, 2017 / AllAfrica

Yilma Yemane’s recently published book ‘A Guide to Coffee Production in Ethiopia’ was written to serve as a manual for various professionals within the coffee industry, and covers production and processing technologies for coffee. Yemane decided to author the book to share his four-decade long experience in the coffee industry …

Tanzania: Ambitious new plan aims to double production of coffee

August 17th, 2017 / AllAfrica.com

Coffee production in Tanzania could more than double in four years’ time if an action programme to increase the competitiveness of small holder farmers is successfully implemented.
The ten-year programme launched in 2011/2012 aims to increase coffee production and quality from 50,000 tonnes a year by then to 150,000 tonnes in …

Climate change to push Ethiopian coffee farming uphill

July 31st, 2017 / SciDev.net

Relocating coffee areas, along with forestation and forest conservation, to higher altitudes to cope with climate change could increase Ethiopia‘s coffee farming area fourfold, a study predicts.
The study, published in Nature last month (19 June), suggests that moving Ethiopian coffee fields to higher ground because of climate change could increase …

How to boost coffee yields amid harsh weather conditions

June 20th, 2017 / Daily Monitor, Uganda

B4FA Fellow Lominda Afedraru reports:
Coffee is a major agricultural commodity in Africa, including Uganda. It is where most people derive their livelihood because it is mainly grown for commercial benefits.
The main type of coffee produced in Uganda is Robusta and it grows well in low altitude areas of central, eastern, …

AfDB explores investment strategies to tilt markets in favour of African farmers

June 13th, 2017 / BizCommunity, South Africa

The African Development Bank (AfDB) has proposed new investment strategies in Africa’s agriculture sector, which, if properly implemented, would effectively alter the market structures around the world in favour of the African farmers of major cash crops like tea, coffee, and cocoa.
AfDB Vice-President for Regional Development, Integration and Business Delivery, …

When you set out to grow robusta coffee

May 22nd, 2017 / Daily Monitor, Uganda

B4FA Fellow Michael Ssali writes:
One of the most important steps for anybody setting out to grow Robusta coffee is to select good quality plantlets. Robusta coffee is a perennial crop from which a farmer can expect income for an entire lifetime. It is important therefore to plant coffee varieties that …

Farm thefts: a big hindrance to agricultural development

March 7th, 2017 / Daily Monitor, Uganda

B4FA Fellow, Michael Ssali, reports: Farm thefts have become a major challenge and it is easy to understand why. The rapid population growth means more mouths to feed. The population increase has resulted in land fragmentation and smaller, overworked, and unproductive land plots. Unpredictable climatic conditions have further made it …

Rwanda: over 3,000 farmers to receive coffee treatment skills

February 16th, 2017 / AllAfrica.com

Sustainable Harvest Rwanda, a nongovernmental organisation that aims to improve coffee productivity, this week launched a three-year-long project to help women better take control of the coffee farming process.
The project, which will focus on three districts (Gakenke, Rulindo and Gicumbi) in the Northern Province, will train more than 3,000 female …

Genetics to guide coffee breeding

February 13th, 2017 / Daily Monitor, Uganda

B4FA Fellow, Michael Ssali writes: Genetic modification (GM) is the future of coffee and the scientists have made their findings public. “With this information in hand, producers can begin to more accurately breed coffee varieties, as opposed to traditional selective breeding where you see a trait you like and breed …

A coffee renaissance is brewing, and thanks to genetics

February 1st, 2017 / Wired, US

Genes are the future of coffee. Not nitro cold brewing or beans pooped out by civets, but genes. And coffee’s gene-fueled future just drew nearer, now that scientists have sequenced the genome of the Coffea arabica coffee plant—the species that makes up the vast majority of global production—and made the …