In the news...

Cameroon: food security – new variety of leguminous plants available

May 12th, 2015 / allAfrica.com

Women from the Centre, North and West Regions in Cameroon are learning how to diversify sources of revenue by baking biscuits using beans, soya beans, groundnuts and peanut flour. The flour is made out of a new varieties of leguminous plants rich in calcium, protein and iron. Read …

Ghana: System Rice intensification Project launched in the Northern Region 15

May 7th, 2015 / Youtube.com

B4FA Fellow Noah Nash reports: The Savannah Agricultural Research Institute, SARI has introduced a System Rice Intensification project to smallholder farmers in the northern region to improve rice yield in the various rice zones in the country. The initiative is also an attempt to ensure that the country meets its …

GMOs: it’s the trait, not the method, that’s important

May 5th, 2015 / The Conversation, UK

Many people have strong opinions about genetically modified plants, also known as genetically modified organisms or GMOs. But sometimes there’s confusion around what it means to be a GMO. It also may be much more sensible to judge a plant by its specific traits rather than the way it was …

Africa: New Global Crop Data Aid in Food Policy Decisions

May 4th, 2015 / AllAfrica.com

Knowing where in the world individual crops are cultivated, their production patterns, and whether they are irrigated or rain fed are essential components for ensuring adequate, sustainable food production and safeguarding food security. Yet this critical data is often inadequate or non-existent, leaving policymakers unable to formulate the best policies …

UN urged to ensure open access to plant genomic data

May 3rd, 2015 / Crop Biotech Update, ISAAA

Dr. Norman Warthmann, plant geneticist from The Australian National University (ANU), has called for the United Nations (UN) to guarantee free and open access to plant DNA sequences to enable scientists to continue working on sustainably intensifying world food production. in feed is safe for animal and human health, …

Will Ethiopia’s teff be the next super grain?

May 1st, 2015 / BBC, UK

Ethiopians have been growing and obsessing about teff for millennia, and it may become the new “super grain” of choice in Europe and North America, overtaking the likes of quinoa and spelt. High in protein and calcium, and gluten-free, teff is already growing in popularity on the international stage. Read …

Can Plant Genetics Help Solve World Hunger? Science Says Yes

May 1st, 2015 / Forbes magazine, USA

When it comes to the earth’s dwindling resources, climbing temperatures and burgeoning population, talk is as plentiful as it is cheap. It can also be contentious. But Dr. Pamela Ronald, professor of plant pathology at University of California, Davis, doesn’t have time for controversy. She’s too busy working toward an …

Fighting the banana bacterial wilt

April 30th, 2015 / Sunday Monitor, Uganda

They say a journey of a thousand miles starts with one step. This is the long walk towards eliminating the Banana Xanthomonas Wilt, commonly known as banana bacterial wilt, which is a major threat to the crop. B4FA Fellow, Lominda Afedraru traces the spread of disease in Uganda, its impact …

Heat tolerant beans fight climate change

April 29th, 2015 / Farmbiz Africa

Bean breeders have discovered 30 types of ‘heat beater beans’ that could keep production from crashing in large swaths of bean-dependent Latin America and Africa, in the wake of fears that global warming could zap a vital source of protein that has sustained humans for centuries. Read …

The role of research in global food and nutrition security

March 28th, 2015 / European Union

A “think piece” suggesting a strategy to address the challenges spanning the production of, access to, and consumption of food. The paper does not make recommendations for policy, rather it aims to prompt discussion of where research and innovation can contribute most to solving the issues, including providing underpinning …