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Best practices of post-harvest handling

September 26th, 2018 / Daily Monitor, Uganda

B4FA Fellow, Lominda Afedraru writes:
Horticulture farming is an important and increasingly becoming reliable source of foreign exchange earnings for the country.
The export earnings from the horticultural sector have been growing spectacularly over the years.
The country has a relatively low market share for almost all horticultural products and therefore, has …

Hybrid maize resists lethal necrosis

September 26th, 2018 / Daily Nation, Kenya

The disease can destroy entire harvests and is thus a severe food security risk.
A centralised maize lethal necrosis disease screening facility established in Naivasha five years ago has released 15 disease-resistant hybrid maize varieties in Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda.
After screening more than 150,000 maize germplasms, the team validated genomic regions …

Achieving sustainable food security in South Africa

September 25th, 2018 / BizCommunity.com

On September 18, I attended a session on Famine to Food Security as part of the Future of Farming Dialogue 2018, hosted by Bayer at their crop science headquarters in Germany – a global enterprise with core competencies in the life science fields of healthcare and agriculture.
While food security is …

UCC develops high yielding drought and disease resilient cowpea varieties

September 24th, 2018 / Ghana News Agency

A team of researchers from the College of Agriculture and Natural Sciences, University of Cape Coast (UCC) has developed eight different varieties of cowpea as part of its “Cowpea Project”.
The varieties, which are more drought and disease resilient and high yielding are expected to be released to seed production companies …

Gene-edited cassava could help millions of farmers

September 24th, 2018 / Alliance for Science, US

Based on the breathless coverage of CRISPR genome editing technology thus far—the famed patent dispute, the overhyped promises of designer babies, the fears of urban biohackers gone mad—you’d be forgiven for thinking that CRISPR is a first-world solution for first-world problems. Indeed, the first CRISPR product to make it out …

Making African agriculture more attractive for investors

September 24th, 2018 / African Business

While global population growth slows, Africa’s population is set to double over the next three decades, reaching around 2.2bn people by 2050.
This surge in numbers will have significant ramifications for the continent’s food security, which is already under pressure mainly due to climate change. The good news is that Africa’s …

An overview of agriculture, nutrition and fortification, supplementation and biofortification

September 24th, 2018 / Agriculture & Food Security

Alan Dubock writes:
The worlds growing population and limited land resources require high intensity of food production. Human nutrition needs both macronutrients and micronutrients. One way of providing micronutrients in staple crops of the poor is biofortification, through plant breeding. All methods of plant breeding are acceptable and safe, and …

The obstacles facing a green revolution in Africa

September 21st, 2018 / The Daily Free Press, US

Beginning in the 1960s, much of Asia underwent dramatic agricultural transformation which saw enormous improvements in production and efficiencies, and subsequently helped pull millions of people out of poverty, prevent famines and modernize the Asian economy. This transformation was dubbed the “Green Revolution,” and is often cited as the key …

Africa: Continent of challenge and opportunity

September 21st, 2018 / The Star, Kenya

LIAM CONDON, Member of the Board of Management and President of the Crop Science Division at Bayer AG writes:
I have a passion for learning about different cultures and languages. This probably comes from the fact that I grew up in Ireland, an island separated from continental Europe, so I always …

Intensive farming ‘least bad option’ for food and environment

September 20th, 2018 / BBC

Intensive, high-yielding agriculture may be the best way to meet growing demand for food while conserving biodiversity, say researchers.
But their study says the approach makes sense only if it is linked to more wilderness being spared the plough.
Intensive farming is said to create high levels of pollution and damage the …