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Weeds tell farmers the kind of soils they have and crops to grow

September 10th, 2015 / Farmbiz Africa

Farmers can easily tell the type of soils on their farms by simply observing the type of weeds that grow in it. This is a cost-free and accurate method of soil sampling that can save farmers from hefty laboratory test costs, while still allowing them to determine the kinds of …

Adding value to African indigenous vegetables

September 9th, 2015 / Daily Monitor, Uganda

B4FA Fellow Lominda Afedraru reports: African Indigenous Vegetables (AIVs) are considered a significant contributor to food security and nutrition for smallholder farmers in East Africa. They are also important as a source of income, particularly for women, although the farmers’ capacity to meet a growing demand for vegetables is limited …

Kenya’s public comments on Bt maize environmental release

September 9th, 2015 / ISAAA, Kenya

Kenya National Biosafety Authority (NBA) has formally received comments from the public as it embarks on analyzing feedback for consideration of the application for environmental release (open cultivation), of genetically modified insect protected maize in Kenya. NBA Chief Executive Officer CEO Dr. Willy Tonui during a public hearing forum said …

School children to learn about soil

September 8th, 2015 / Farmbiz Africa

Kenyan children are among those set to benefit from a new set of materials that explain the importance of soil in crop production. This is as nations target children in the role they play as future food producers. With 50 per cent of the global population being youth of less …

Brazil: An indigenous village produces super cassava

September 4th, 2015 / World Bank

Brazil’s Terena indigenous community has combined ancient practices and new technologies to increase the quality and quantity of this popular root crop. The Terena began to experiment with new organic fertilizers that make use of cassava peels, and adopted a new variety of (non-transgenic) root: IAC 576-70, known as amarelinha, …

A 2nd Green Revolution has begun: rice, food security, and climate change

September 3rd, 2015 / IRRI, Philippines

As the global population continues to grow toward a predicted nine billion souls by 2050, it will be humanity’s greatest challenge to produce more food to feed the world 35 years hence without wrecking the planet. These challenges must be met in the face of food production systems that …

Ten apps to boost African agriculture

September 3rd, 2015 / Venturesafrica.com

Analysts have shown that by 2025 half of Africa’s population will have internet access with about 360 million smartphones on the continent. Also based on their estimation, internet technology could increase annual agricultural productivity in Africa by $3 billion per annum. Throughout the continent, farmers, NGOs and scientists are …

Ghana: agriculture must be seen as serious business

September 2nd, 2015 / The Chronicle, Ghana

According to Ghana’s President Mahama, when people begin to take agriculture as business, they would not only be ensuring food security, but also partnering the government in its efforts to promote agriculture, which is crucial to the rapid socioeconomic development of the country. The President assured the people of the …

Why farms of the future need to mix livestock and crops

September 2nd, 2015 / Devex, US

Today, for hundreds of millions of the world’s smallholder farmers, livestock — a few cattle or maybe a small herd of goats and a flock of chickens — are by far the most important household asset. Moreover, these animals typically live on a small farm of about a hectare (a …

244 reasons why GMOs are safe

September 2nd, 2015 / Genetic Literacy Project, US

To date, more than 2000 scientific studies have assessed the safety of these crops in terms of human health and environmental impact. These studies together with several reviews performed on a case by case from regulatory agencies around the world, have enabled a solid and clear scientific consensus: GM crops …