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Epigenetically modified organisms: The coming EPO farming and food revolution?

February 10th, 2016 / Genetic Literacy Project, US

Agriculture around the world faces a myriad of problems: Pests, weeds, random and extreme weather, and drought, to name a few. While none of these issues are new, because of climate change in particular, several of them are being exacerbated. Techniques like genetic engineering, artificial selection, and mutagenesis have made …

Scientists make breakthrough in blight-resistant Irish potatoes

February 10th, 2016 / Daily Monitor, Uganda

B4FA Fellow Lominda Afedraru reports: National Agricultural Research Organisation (Naro) is in the process of breeding Irish Potato varieties that are resistant to late blight, a fungal disease ravaging the crop in farmers’ fields across the country. Read …

Gene-edited crops ‘should not be subject to government oversight’

February 9th, 2016 / Nature Genetics

An editorial in Nature Genetics has called for gene-edited crops to be subject to no more regulation than crops developed through conventional breeding. In an accompanying commentary, Chinese, German and US researchers make the case that many applications of gene-editing would lead to crops that would, at least in theory, …

Suppressing growth: how GMO opposition hurts developing nations

February 9th, 2016 / Information Technology & Innovation Foundation

Meet Campaigns against genetically modified organisms (GMOs), originating primarily in Europe, have created significant obstacles to the development and adoption of genetically modified crops. While the policies and practices resulting from these campaigns impose considerable costs on the economies of origin, they disproportionately hurt those nations with the greatest need …

The importance of plant science

February 9th, 2016 / The Scientist

Meet Professor Natasha Raikel and hear her explain why studying plant genetics is crucial. View …

Livestock diversity crucial to ending global hunger

February 8th, 2016 / Bangkok Post, Thailand

Our livestock is increasingly being raised indoors and fed on concentrate feed that is often imported. Intensive production of chickens, pigs and dairy cows is based on a few breeds worldwide. These developments are risky, as we and future generations are losing the potential to adapt livestock production systems to …

How bacteria invented gene editing

February 8th, 2016 / BBC.com, UK

Gene editing is much more common in nature than you might think. It actually has ancient ro Read …

Saving the banana

February 8th, 2016 / Scroll.in

Catastrophe is looming for the banana industry. A new strain has emerged of a soil-borne fungus known as “Panama disease” which can wipe out entire plantations – and it is rapidly spreading around the world. Farmers in Australia, Latin America and across Asia and Africa all fear the worst. The …

Fungus-resistant wheat varieties released, farmers to get seed

February 6th, 2016 / Daily Monitor, Uganda

B4FA Fellow Lominda Afedraru reports: National Agricultural Research Organisation (Naro) is to make available a couple of disease-resistant wheat varieties to farmers for the next planting season. The three recently released varieties are resistant to UG99 stem rust virus and were developed by Buginyanya Zonal Agricultural Research and Development Institute …

Initiative targets job creation and decent work for young people

February 6th, 2016 / FAO, Italy

“Poverty and hunger cannot be eradicated without addressing the inadequacy of employment conditions and opportunities facing the world’s young people, especially for young women and those living in rural areas,” said Brave Ndisale, FAO Social Protection Division Deputy Director. Read …