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Six key messages wrapping up the International Year of Soils

January 5th, 2016 / FAO, Italy

In 2015 we celebrated the “International Year of Soils” and with good reason. Soil sustains all our agricultural and livestock food production, wood for fuel production, filters water so that we can drink it and fish can live in it. We also use it for construction – therefore it sustains …

Dry season farming yields more money

January 4th, 2016 / Leadership, Nigeria

Dr Idris Badiru, a Senior Lecturer, Department of Agric Extension and Rural Development, University of Ibadan, says dry season farming yields more money to farmers. Badiru told the News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) in Ibadan on Sunday that farmers get more returns from less effort in dry season. The Agric …

Forage farming changes lives of Zimbabwe smallholder farmers

January 4th, 2016 / ILRI News

With the right training and support, food and nutrition insecurity can become a thing from the past. With training in conservation agriculture and fodder production practices, the Gore family have tripled their income in two years and are now able to pay for their children’s school fees. After buying goats, …

Resurrection plants could lead to more drought-tolerant crops

January 3rd, 2016 / AgWeb.com

Recent genome sequencing of Oropetium grass has given researchers a blueprint in distinguishing genes related to phenomenal plant resilience. The bizarre self-preservation abilities of resurrection plants like Oropetium hold tremendous promise toward engineering stronger drought-tolerance in crops, and the effects soon could reach farmland. Read …

Positive change to the global food system

January 3rd, 2016 / EcoWatch, US

16 stories that represent the most exciting food trends for 2016 Read …

What you need to know about Genetic Modification

January 3rd, 2016 / Daily Trust, Nigeria

Humans have been genetically modifying plants and animals for thousands of years through selective cross-breeding and domestication. Prior to the 1970s, it was primarily conducted by selecting the seeds of the best crops to sow each year, which eventually created relatively uniform strains of crop plants.
Through hybridization, farmers were also …

Cameroon: on the path to introducing GMOs

January 2nd, 2016 / IPS

Cameroon is on the path to introduce genetically modified organisms (GMO’s). This would be overseen by the Cameroon Academy of Sciences, in collaboration with the National Biosafety Committee, if the Cameroon Cotton Corporation successfully implements a three-year test cultivation of cotton. The introduction of GMOs is seen by many as …

US$4 million project to control maize lethal necrosis

January 2nd, 2016 / SciDev.net, UK

A new project has been launched to control the spread of a lethal viral disease which affects maize yields and threatens food security in many Sub-Saharan Africa countries. The project for tackling maize lethal necrosis (MLN), funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), was launched at a …

Inter-planting coffee and banana to cope with climate change

January 2nd, 2016 / IPS

Studies by the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) and partner organizations show that a Ugandan farmer gets 50 per cent more income from inter cropping coffee and banana than from growing either crop alone. Conducted in over 30 districts of Uganda, the study showed that coffee yield remained the …

GM wheat is coming

January 1st, 2016 / High Plains Journal, US

Regulatory approval of modified wheat could be politically influenced in the decade ahead. Liberal governments in rich countries make strange decisions. If population grows as predicted in the developing world there will be both need and demand. There is no guarantee the first genetically modified wheat will come from the …