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Editing out pesticides

August 12th, 2016 / Nova Next, US

This summer, more than a million tonnes of chardonnay grapes are plumping on manicured vineyards around the world. The grapes make one of the most popular white wines, but their juicy fruit and luscious leaves are also targets for diseases such as downy mildew, a stubborn fungus-like parasite. If left …

Gene-edited crops ‘should not be subject to government oversight’

February 9th, 2016 / Nature Genetics

An editorial in Nature Genetics has called for gene-edited crops to be subject to no more regulation than crops developed through conventional breeding. In an accompanying commentary, Chinese, German and US researchers make the case that many applications of gene-editing would lead to crops that would, at least in theory, …

How bacteria invented gene editing

February 8th, 2016 / BBC.com, UK

Gene editing is much more common in nature than you might think. It actually has ancient ro Read …

A new breed of edits

December 14th, 2015 / Nature, UK

Genome editing allows much smaller changes to be made to DNA compared with conventional genetic engineering. In terms of agriculture, this might win over public and regulator opinion. Genome editing offers both subtlety and speed, wherever in the genome a researcher wants to target. The speed comes from the technologies’ …

The genetic revolution could curb world hunger and pesticide use

December 10th, 2015 / Huffington Post

Over the past year or so, researchers around the world have begun using a new gene-editing technique that has the potential to help stop world hunger, end the use of pesticides and improve our health. CRISPR-Cas9 allows scientists to change, delete or replace DNA more easily than ever before. Theoretically, …

Using CRISPR to edit crops ensures no transgenes, undercuts anti-GM ‘foreign gene’ criticism

December 7th, 2015 / Genetic Literacy Project

A team of scientists from the John Innes Centre and The Sainsbury Laboratory have shown that the very latest gene-editing technology CRISPR can be used to make targeted changes or edits to specific genes in two UK crops – a broccoli-like brassica and barley – and that these edits are …

What everyone should know about cut-and-paste genetics

December 1st, 2015 / Nature, UK

The ethics of human-genome editing is in the spotlight again as a large international meeting on the topic is poised to kick off in Washington DC. Ahead of the summit, which is being jointly organized by the US National Academy of Sciences, the US National Academy of Medicine, the …

Can gene editing provide a solution to global hunger?

July 6th, 2015 / The Conversation

Gene editing is a promising technique to help increase nutrients in crops or make them more resilient. However, there remain uncertainties about the impact of gene-edited organisms on the environment and health. Research is currently under way to improve these techniques, reduce the frequency of unwanted mutations and improve safety. …