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Nature busts anti-GMO myth: gene swapping among plants, insects common occurence

October 1st, 2016 / Genetic Literacy Project, US

There is a fierce debate in Florida over how the state should work to stop the spread of the Zika virus. One controversial solution offered is to release GMO mosquitoes. These lab-made bugs possess a ‘kill-switch’ gene made with fragments of DNA from coral, cabbage, the herpes virus, and E.coli …

Will big agriculture mergers impact smallholder farmers?

October 1st, 2016 / deveximpact, US

Roughly 90 percent of the world’s farmers classified as smallholders who are spread across the developing world and feed into global value chains? How will the mega-mergers of Dow Chemicals and Dupont, Bayer and Monsanto and Syngenta and China National Chemical Corp. — ChemChina, for short — affect the incomes …

Former anti-GMO campaigner Mark Lynas: Green movement should support crop biotech

September 30th, 2016 / Genetic Literacy Project, US

Former anti-GMO campaigner Mark Lynas discusses what changed his mind about GMOs. He addresses why the green movement is so threatened by GMOs and why the environmental movement should be an ally in promoting biotech that reduce environmental impacts of agriculture. See …

Success of GMO crops in neighbouring countries may influence adoption in Ghana

September 28th, 2016 / Genetic Literacy Project, US

Ghana is currently running confined field trials of some selected GE crops, but analysis of ongoing genetically modified organism (GMO) debates and published opinions shows a considerable amount of opposition to GE agriculture and GMOs in Ghana. This notwithstanding, we suggest that Bt cotton cultivation in Burkina Faso—Ghana’s immediate neighbor …

Federal Government begins enforcement on GMO rice

September 23rd, 2016 / Today, Nigeria

The Federal Government has begun visiting research institutes that conduct field trials on genetically modified rice. The move, according to officials, was to ensure strict compliance with extant laws. See …

EU’s GMO blockade trumps science and technology

September 23rd, 2016 / The Parliament Magazine, EU

Too many European politicians have chosen to either side with radical activist groups that misinform the public about GMOs, or to avoid speaking up against the misinformation. I believe that ignoring the scientific consensus and farmers’ needs, and expelling an entire technology is a high price to pay for political …

Genetically modified plants – technology’s ugly duckling

September 21st, 2016 / DW.com, Germany

Genetically modified food has never enjoyed the best reputation. Such is the depth of opposition to GM, even ideas that seem to promise a better future have been viewed with the utmost suspicion. Few developers of genetically modified food enjoy a reputation for being one of the good guys. Even …

Maize genetics may show how crops adapt to climate change

September 16th, 2016 / phys.org

With the onset of climate change and changes in irrigation, adapting food crops to grow in diverse environments could help feed the world. Now University of California, Davis, scientists are leading a major new project, funded by the National Science Foundation with $4.1 million over five years, to study genetic …

Kenya: Nod on GM cotton field trials shifts focus to release of biotech maize

September 14th, 2016 / Daily Nation, Kenya

A decision by the National Bio-Safety Authority (NBA), to approve open field trials for genetically modified (GM) cotton is bound to raise more confusion in an area that has been dogged by controversy.
There has been a push and pull regarding release of biotech maize for National Performance Trials even after …

Top scientists debate biotechnology

September 14th, 2016 / New Vision, Uganda

Scientists from different fields discussed the application of biotechnology in Uganda. Dr. Arthur Tuguma, a lecturer of genetics and plant pathology in the department of Plant Sciences, Microbiology and Biotechnology at Makerere University, said there is need to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of the technology.
On his part, Dr Elioda …