In the news...

Kenya cotton farmers get a presidential nod to grow GM cotton

October 23rd, 2018 / The Exchange, Tanzania

In the 80s and 90s, Kenya cotton industry was thriving with commercial and small scale production in Western, Nyanza, Eastern and Coastal regions relying on the crop for income generation. However, years of neglect and introduction of second hand clothes led to the collapse of both cotton ginneries as well …

Viewpoint: It’s time to replace our fear-based genetic engineering regulations

October 22nd, 2018 / Genetic Literacy Project

In the early 1970s a group of scientists β€” none involved in agriculture or food β€” raised concerns about the hypothetical hazards that might arise from the use of the newly discovered molecular genetic modification techniques (recombinant DNA technology) that could alter the inheritable characteristics of an organism via directed …

Cameroon: adoption of genetically modified crops imminent

October 18th, 2018 / AllAfrica.com

The successful introduction of genetically modified cotton in the northern regions would pave the way for trials on other cereals nationwide as a measure to curb food insecurity.
The progressive introduction of Genetically modified organisms (GMO) in Cameroon that started since 2012 has been smooth, Dr. David Akuroh Mbah, Chief Research …

Fall army worm is here to stay unless a miracle happens

October 16th, 2018 / The Standard, Kenya

Speaking at a meeting on disaster risk management in Tunis, Monday Ahonsi, the fall army worm portfolio manager at International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), said it was important that stakeholders in agriculture address early enough the strategies by which every country will counter the spread of the pest. …

Introduce students to biotechnology early

October 16th, 2018 / Daily Monitor, Uganda

B4FA Fellow MichaelSsali who has often argued that the school is the best place to introduce agricultural skills to young people through practical work in the school garden, writes:
Perhaps due to lack of correct information about the many benefits of agricultural biotechnology, it has taken so long for Ugandan policy …

Biosafety: A sure path to sustainable economic development

October 15th, 2018 / NAIJ.com

World over there is no Biosafety Agency created with an aim to stop the practice of modern Biotechnology or GMOs but rather these Agencies are created to help it thrive in a positive way by harnessing their potentials for farmers and the Agricultural sector for economic growth and Nigeria should …

Ghana ready to introduce GMOs – Biosafety Authority

October 9th, 2018 / Graphic Online, Ghana

Ghana is now ready to introduce genetically modified organisms (GMOs) food onto the market, the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the National Biosafety Authority (NBA), Dr Amaning Okoree, has announced.
He said the NBA, which is the regulator of the biotechnology industry in Ghana, had put in place the necessary structures …

Scientists design a more productive maize to cope with future climates

October 5th, 2018 / ISAAA, US

An international research team has found that they can increase the productivity of maize by targeting the enzyme in charge of capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere. Dr. Robert Sharwood from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Translational Photosynthesis at The Australian National University (ANU), said they developed a …

Nigerian FG commences field trials on GMO crops

October 4th, 2018 / The Guardian, Nigeria

The Federal Government has granted permits for confined field trials on genetically modified maize, rice, cassava, sorghum and cowpea to ascertain ability to resist insect attack in the country.
Country Coordinator of Open Forum on Agriculture Biotechnology (OFAB), Dr. Rose Gidado, told The Guardian that the permits were granted after in-depth …

Pioneering biologists create a new crop through genome editing

October 3rd, 2018 / Phys.org

Crops such as wheat and maize have undergone a breeding process lasting thousands of years, in the course of which mankind has gradually modified the properties of wild plants into highly cultivated variants. One motive was higher yields. A side effect of this breeding has been a reduction in genetic …