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Ghana prepares to commercialize its first GMO crop

November 6th, 2018 / Alliance for Science, US

Ghanaian scientists have completed field trials on the pest-resistant Bt cowpea and will soon apply for commercial release of the country’s first genetically modified (GM) crop.
The GM crop is expected to help farmers dramatically reduce their use of pesticides, while also enjoying better yields of this important staple food.
Scientists said …

New push in pipeline for acceptance of GMO seeds

November 5th, 2018 / IPP Media

THE Tanzania Agricultural Research Institute (TARI) has joined farmers across the country in pushing for changes to existing agricultural laws to allow the use of genetically modified
organism (GMO) seed varieties because they are drought resistant and can’t be easily destroyed by pests.
This follows successful trials conducted at the TARI …

Field trials of GM maize shows signs of withstanding stem borer and Fall armyworm

November 1st, 2018 / Daily News, Tanzania

TANZANIA’s second year of confined field trials of genetic modified maize is bearing fruit, as the crop has significantly shown signs of withstanding stem borer and fall armyworm attacks, compared to conventional maize varieties.
The confined field trials (CFT), which started in April 2016, are located in the semiarid area of …

GMO debate must be refocused on scientific facts

October 26th, 2018 / Joy Online, Ghana

A Plant Breeding lecturer at Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) is calling for a refocus of the debate on genetically modified foods in the country.
Dr Alexander Wireko Kena says it is about time that the debate is centred more on scientific facts and less on emotions, adding …

Genetic engineering solutions for medical and agricultural challenges

October 23rd, 2018 / Blue and Green Tomorrow

GE technology has had a very positive impact on our world. The change has been most significant in the agricultural industry, but the medical industry has been affected to. Fortunately, it has had a positive impact on the environment, which should make our lives much better in the long-term. Read …

Biosafety: A sure path to sustainable economic development

October 15th, 2018 / NAIJ.com

World over there is no Biosafety Agency created with an aim to stop the practice of modern Biotechnology or GMOs but rather these Agencies are created to help it thrive in a positive way by harnessing their potentials for farmers and the Agricultural sector for economic growth and Nigeria should …

An overview of agriculture, nutrition and fortification, supplementation and biofortification

September 24th, 2018 / Agriculture & Food Security

Alan Dubock writes:
The worlds growing population and limited land resources require high intensity of food production. Human nutrition needs both macronutrients and micronutrients. One way of providing micronutrients in staple crops of the poor is biofortification, through plant breeding. All methods of plant breeding are acceptable and safe, and …

Kenyan scientists concerned perceptions on GMOs may slow down GM crops commercialization

September 19th, 2018 / ISAAA, US

Kenyan scientists have expressed their concern that negative perceptions tied to genetically modified organism (GMOs) could be detrimental in commercializing GM crops in the country. Speaking during a cassava stakeholder study tour to GM cassava research confined field trial (CFT) site in the country’s coastal region, the scientists dismissed any …

Embracing biotech crops and why Nigeria’s GMO fight is far from over

September 11th, 2018 / Genetic Literacy Project

When examining Nigeria’s potential to step into an agricultural leadership role in the region, it’s important to consider what it took to get this far — as well as the forces that long opposed GMOs throughout that nation, writes bioinformaticist Abraham Isah. Read …

Are genetically modified organisms (GMOs) a blessing or a curse?

August 30th, 2018 / Life Science Leader, US

Back in March of this year, a reader of Life Science Leader magazine submitted the above question for our popular monthly Ask The Board column. Started in our February 2011 issue, the column enables readers to submit questions, which are then posed to a member of Life Science Leader’s editorial …