In the news...

How to boost local fertiliser production

March 25th, 2019 / The Nation, Nigeria

At an average of 12 kilogrammes per hectare, fertiliser usage in Nigeria and other African countries have been considered low, compared to the global average of 100 kilogrammes per hectare. But, prompted by Africa’s fast-growing population, as well as the increasing awareness that high quality fertiliser is key to increased …

Livestock feeding a key factor in gainful farming

March 25th, 2019 / Daily Monitor, Uganda

B4FA Fellow Michael Ssali writes:

Livestock keeping is an enterprise whose main objective is to get profit at the end of the day. Much as we raise animals for our own benefit, they have rights such as the right to adequate, good, clean food. It would be unfair for us to keep …

Get good seeds for planting

March 11th, 2019 / Daily Monitor, Uganda

B4FA Fellow Michael Ssali writes:

As we begin this rainy season, many crop farmers across the country are preparing to plant seeds. Seeds are a major input in crop production.If the seeds are of poor quality, the farmer will not get high yields even if the soil is good and the …

Connecting food waste and sanitation services can help African farmers

March 3rd, 2019 / Phys.org

Across the continent less than 10% of the population is connected to a sewer system; with most households using some type of onsite sanitation technology (e.g. pit latrines or septic tanks). If not managed properly, untreated excreta can have serious human and environmental health impacts. But if managed adequately, human waste can offer many opportunities: …

Fighting against pests

February 18th, 2019 / Daily Monitor, Uganda

B4FA Fellow Michael Ssali reports:

Farmers always worry about possible loss of their crops due to pests and crop diseases. It is one of the reasons they keep monitoring their fields to ensure all is going on well. Fighting pests and crop diseases increases the farmers’ production costs and often reduces profits.

It …

GM crops create “halo effect” that benefits organic farmers, says new research

January 28th, 2019 / Alliance for Science, US

Mark Lynas writes:

Growing genetically modified insect-resistant corn in the United States has dramatically reduced insecticide use and created a “halo effect” that also benefits farmers raising non-GM and organic crops, new research shows.

This finding, published by University of Maryland researchers in the prestigious peer-reviewed journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, effectively …

Fixing the nitrogen problem

January 16th, 2019 / Alliance for Science, US

In this video by Robert Hazen of the Alliance for Science, scientists from the Engineering Nitrogen Symbiosis for Africa (ENSA) project discuss how they are using genetic engineering to transfer the nitrogen-fixing capabilities of legumes (peas and beans) into cereal crops. Their work could help small-holder farmers in Africa and elsewhere realize higher yields, …

Ghana: How rapid population growth could become an emergency and outpace both food production and economic growth

August 23rd, 2018 / AllAfrica.com

Ghana’s economy is predominately dependent on agriculture, particularly cocoa, though the government has taken steps to ensure that the cultivation of staples such as rice, maize and soya is also enhanced.
The Food and Agricultural Organisation of the United Nations (FAO) says that 52 percent of the country’s labour force is …

Six ways Africa can unlock its agricultural potential

May 22nd, 2018 / How we made Africa

Agriculture holds the key to broad-based economic growth, poverty reduction and food security in sub-Saharan Africa. This is according to Deutsche Bank senior analyst Claire Schaffnit-Chatterjee, in her report on agriculture for the bank. Read this excerpt that looks at how sub-Saharan Africa can unlock its agricultural potential.” Read …

How regulators ensure that pesticide residues on food don’t hurt us

May 17th, 2018 / Alliance for Science, US

Due to my relationship with the world of food, I constantly hear inaccurate comments about GMOs and agricultural pesticides. While these conversations indicate that people are increasingly concerned about what they eat, they also reveal a disturbing level of misinformation.
In my opinion, this is due primarily to activists and …