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Rwanda takes early steps towards legalising GMOs

January 12th, 2018 / New Times, Rwanda

Rwanda Environment Management Authority (REMA) has drafted a law governing genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in Rwanda which will soon be forwarded to the Rwanda Law Reform Commission for review.
The draft bill was prepared along with the National Biosafety Framework, biosafety policy and regulations according to officials.
The objective of the legislation …

Role of biotechnology in ensuring food security, sustainable agriculture

January 12th, 2018 / Nigerian Observer

By most accounts, low agricultural production is one of the prevailing factors behind the high incidence of poverty and food insecurity across the world.
However, concerned observers note that most poor and food insecure people in the world live in developing countries and rural areas.
They say that one of the most …

GMO crops could help stem famine and future global conflicts

January 12th, 2018 / Alliance for Science, US

Though there a few GE drought-tolerant crops on the market today, scientists all over the world are developing new crops in an effort to better prepare farmers for the increasingly severe droughts we expect to see.
Researchers at the University of Cape Town in South Africa are working to genetically …

Australia and New Zealand releases approval report for food derived from Provitamin A Rice

January 11th, 2018 / ISAAA, US

Food derived from Provitamin A rice line GR2E can be sold in Australia and New Zealand. Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) released the approval report for Application A1138 submitted by the International Rice Research Institute seeking approval for food derived from rice line GR2E, genetically modified (GM) to produce …

Scientists project good harvest this year, as plans to release BT cotton, Cowpea, others gain support

January 10th, 2018 / Nigerian Tribune

Scientists in Nigeria have said that plans to release BT cotton, Pod Borer Resistant (PBR) Cowpea, Genetically Modified Cassava and other crops have been given green light, as Confined Field Trial for these crops have been conducted successfully.
The scientists also said that the formal release of these crops to farmers …

What innovations in food production are likely to have significant Impact in the next decade?

January 10th, 2018 / The Borlaug Blog, World Food Prize

Dr. Robert Mwanga, 2016 World Food Prize Laureate, writes:
“Innovations in food production” is a broad topic. These innovations are diverse and hold immense potential in addressing hunger in the world, but the main critical factors to significantly impact planet earth in the next decade must be considered first. We must …

Ethiopian scientist impacting lives of small-scale farmers

January 8th, 2018 / AfricanNews.com

Dr. Segenet Kelemu according to Gates, having witnessed the damage locusts wreak in rural Ethiopia, aspired to study agriculture and today “used the power of science to find ways to help farmers grow more food and earn more income.”
In the latest installment of his ‘Heroes in the Field’ series, philanthropist …

New technologies are re-engineering traditional plant breeding to meet global food security challenges

January 5th, 2018 / Nature Plants, UK

Breeding crops with a high yield and superior adaptability is vital to maintaining global food security. New technologies on multiple scales are re-engineering traditional plant breeding to meet these challenges. Read more …

Hidden threat to health

January 3rd, 2018 / Phys.org

One of the most ambitious programmes to provide lasting improvements in nutrition in sub-Saharan Africa begins today when a diverse multinational team of experts from agriculture to ethics start looking for ways to end dietary deficiencies in essential micronutrients.
Rothamsted Research is contributing soil and crop expertise to the programme, known …

Challenge of food waste is put centre stage at Oxford Farming Conference

January 3rd, 2018 / Farming Life, UK

In Africa, which contributes approximately 18% of global postharvest food losses, they suggest the research base is too low across the continent, with the majority of research stemming from South Africa. Professor Terry argues that UK research funds should be used to address this imbalance. “The global threat to food …