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To predict droughts, don’t look at the skies. Look in the soil… from space

January 29th, 2019 / The Conversation

Scientists and governments alike have been looking for ways to measure drought in a way that relates more closely to its impacts. Any farmer or gardener can tell you that you don’t need much rain, but you do need it at the right time. This is where the soil becomes …

Lessons from Kenya on how to restore degraded land

August 20th, 2018 / The Conversation

The state of the earth’s biodiversity – the world’s variety of living organisms – is in crisis. About one third of the world’s land has been severely degraded from its natural state. Some of the worst forms of degradation include deforestation, soil erosion, loss of soil fertility, declining water quality …

How soil scientists can do a better job of making their research useful

August 15th, 2018 / The Conversation

Soil is a vital part of the natural environment. It supports the growth of plants, is a habitat for many different organisms and is at the heart of nearly all agricultural production. It also plays an integral role in countless other ecosystem services like water and climate regulation.
Despite this, soil …

Uganda’s soils undergoing last key changes, says soil scientist

July 13th, 2018 / Daily Monitor

A cross-section of scientists believe that Uganda’s fields have already entered the final stages of weathering. This means that the soils fertility of the land is not the same anymore. The situation has been worsened by bad farming practices, swamp degradation and over working the land among other factors. This …

Too much or not enough rain, we must manage soils and rainwater better

February 6th, 2017 / The Herald

Agro-ecologist, Franz Ulrich Fischer, who has experience working in southern Africa, told The Herald Business that several factors including population growth, changes in land use and deforestation had worsened the impact of extreme events, but damage could be curtailed.
“A key to addressing droughts and floods is looking closer to the …

Organic farming will not feed growing African population

September 14th, 2016 / ENCA, South Africa

Soil experts gathered in Nairobi for the ongoing African Green Revolution Forum have on Thursday, said that Africa has no choice but to use quality fertilisers to improve the soil quality to produce enough food.
The experts said that Africa cannot rely on organic farming to feed the rapidly growing population …