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As drought hits, Tanzania cooks up sweet potato

September 11th, 2015 / Thomson Reuters Foundation, UK

In the wind-swept plains of Kishapu, in Tanzania’s northern Shinyanga region, Himelda Tumbo has for a few years struggled to grow maize on her farm. “I have suffered huge losses due to drought. The seasonal rains are not enough and the crops are drying up,” she complained. Maize once …

Tanzanian farmer brings forest back to life

August 14th, 2015 / SciDev.net

The village of Nkoasenga in northern Tanzania is increasingly experiencing drought and soil degradation, which make it harder for local people to grow food and cash crops. Jonas Somi, a 65-year-old farmer from Nkoasenga, blames the village’s environmental problems on deforestation and is planting fast-growing Grevillea robusta to provide shade …

Lack of funds hurts Tanzania’s biotech centre

July 20th, 2015 / OnIslam.net

Tanzania Commission for Science and Technology (COSTECH) Director for Information and Documentation Dr. Nicholas Nyange says that although Tanzania has experts in the agricultural sector with sufficient knowledge and methods, a lack of adequate financial resources impedes investment in research and innovation. Read …

Tanzania: fruit & veg industry to curb unemployment

July 16th, 2015 / Tanzania Daily News

As a solution to unemployment, alongside proper processing and storage of fishing and farm products, the government last year decided to establish the ‘Zanzibar Technology and Business Incubator (ZTBI)’ centre. The mission of ZTBI is to stimulate new business development and growth of enterprises into successful well structures and full …

People can reverse effects of climate change

July 13th, 2015 / Tanzania Daily News

Climate change is wreaking havoc in the countryside and as a result people’s food source has been largely disturbed. Crops resistance to diseases and pests has changed. Their maturities and yield levels too have changed just as management practices, taste, eating habits and lifestyle. Growing drought resistant crops, however, can …

Tanzania: Use of inferior crop seeds lowers food output

July 10th, 2015 / AllAfrica.com

Continual use of unimproved and inferior quality seeds by most Tanzanians is seemingly plaguing the country’s production of food and cash crops. Despite a significant improvement in the utilisation of improved seeds by 25 per cent, available statistics show that about 75 per cent of seeds used by agricultural producers …

Tanzania Dep. Min. for Agri advocates biotech

July 1st, 2015 / Crop Biotech Update, ISAAA

Tanzania’s Assistant Minister for Agriculture, Food Security and Cooperatives, Mr. Godfrey Zambi, said that Tanzania cannot afford to ignore the benefits of biotechnology in developing various sectors of the economy, especially in agriculture. He said this during the launch of the ISAAA Brief 49: Global Status of Commercialized Biotech/GM Crops …

Citrus farmers eye juicy future

June 29th, 2015 / Farmbiz Africa

Citrus farmers in Kenya and Tanzania are set to benefit from a project that seeks to embrace alternative pest control methods and identifying suitable areas for its plantation, a move key in spurring citrus farming at a time when demand has failed to match supply leading to imports. Read …

Tanzania: Iringa – a sparkling jewel for farmers

June 25th, 2015 / Tanzania Daily News

Almost all residents in Iringa Region earn their living from agriculture and livestock rearing. Agriculture has, so far, ensured food security. Small-holder and large-scale farmers produce surpluses of maize, which is the major food crop grown in the region. Other crops of economic importance, include paddy, wheat, sweet potatoes, round …

Poor seeds hold back Tanzania’s cotton

June 23rd, 2015 / East Africa Business Week, Uganda

Seeds rank as the very basis of agriculture production, but use of uncertified seeds is one of the major reasons for low cotton output in Tanzania. “Despite challenges, for the long term sustainability of the cotton industry, the quality of seeds for planting should not be compromised,” John Baffes, an …