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Nitrogen-fixing tech aiding legume yields

January 5th, 2016 / SciDev.net, UK

A low-cost nitrogen fixing technology for legume crops is being given to small-scale farmers in Zimbabwe to improve national food and nutrition security. The Chemistry and Soil Research Institute in Zimbabwe is distributing sachets that contain inoculated Rhizobia bacteria — a technique for adding bacteria to a carrier medium to …

Forage farming changes lives of Zimbabwe smallholder farmers

January 4th, 2016 / ILRI News

With the right training and support, food and nutrition insecurity can become a thing from the past. With training in conservation agriculture and fodder production practices, the Gore family have tripled their income in two years and are now able to pay for their children’s school fees. After buying goats, …

Zanu-PF embraces biotechnology

December 18th, 2015 / Southern Times, South Africa

Zanu-PF is moving closer to embracing biotechnology to increase food production in the country, with the ruling party coming out in its support as a tool to fight hunger and poverty. The party’s secretary of science and technology Professor Jonathan Moyo told delegates at the just-ended Zanu PF’s 15th Annual …

Time we embraced GMOs

November 14th, 2015 / The Herald, Zimbabwe

OPINION, Lloyd Gumbo writes “… Government must allow trials on the BT Cotton to establish if it is compatible with Zimbabwean soil if we are to reduce the cost of production and increase yields.This is the only way our cotton farmers can get value for their products on the international …

Facing drought-induced food shortage, Zimbabwe confronts GMO dilemma

October 26th, 2015 / Genetic Literacy Project, US

Zimbabwe is facing a crippling maize (staple in Zimbabwe) shortage. Vice President of Zimbabwe, Emmerson Mnangagwa, has revealed that the cash strapped government needs at least US$300 million to import 700 000 tons of maize to meet national consumption. And According to the World Food Program (WFP), Zimbabwe’s food crisis …

As drought destroys maize, Zimbabwe tries new climate-resilient staples

September 14th, 2015 / AllAfrica

In a country where maize porridge is ingrained in eating habits, Jambezi farmers are growing sorghum and millet for food, cash and to improve their resilience to harsher weather conditions that have made maize an increasingly risky crop. Read …